Reader: The Hobbit. Chapter 6 “Out Of The Frying-Pan Into The Fire”

The Hobbit Book CoverSummary Points

  • Bilbo managed to come out on the eastern slopes of the Misties.
  • Gandalf was a true friend, or a responsible tour-guide, who seemed to abide by the “leave no one behind” principle.

  • The Dwarves on the other hand, would prefer to move on, and were quick to forget any help Bilbo rendered in their short time together. Quite a disturbing lack of solidarity, never mind loyalty.
  • Dori gave a good account of himself as to how Bilbo was lost during the melee.
  • Bilbo’s pride and dependence on the Ring was began.
    • The Dwarves esteem of Bilbo exploded, where moments before Bilbo’s “boo-ya”, they were confusticating having to retrieve him or risk going it without Gandalf thereon.
    • Poor Balin who thought his guardly faculties on the decline.
    • Dwarves loved a good yarn, and Bilbo could spin one. He could not quite pull it over Gandalf’s wizardly eyes though.
  • Gandalf and Elrond, wise as they were, may not have the latest and greatest all the time. Evidently, Goblins remodel and redecorate to take advantage of where the victims frequent.
  • One tended to lose track of time in darkness.
  • Goblins were in cahoots with the evil wolves over the Edge of the Wild (aka Wargs).
  • Goblins tended to vengence. Probably gearing up for some serious campaigning for the next Great Goblin too.
  • Dwarves could climb trees in a crunch.
  • Hobbits were severely disavantaged when trees needed to be ascended in a hurry.
  • Dori was really a decent dwarf, giving Bilbo a leg-up even when he retired himself from Bilbo-lugging duty.
  • The Company’s streak of bad luck continued, having stumbled into a Warg pow-wow spot.
  • Gandalf was truly a polyglot.
  • Despite the god-forsaken nature of the area, men from the south had built settlements there.
  • Wargs on fire made for a din that would catch the attention of the Lord of the Eagles.
  • Goblins were much like Dwarves with their penchant for songs for any occasion.
  • Dwarves and Hobbits had vertigo.
  • Gandalf had friends in high places. Men could do well to learn the art of friendship from him.
  • The Eagles were handy to have in a pinch, helping the Company to end their journey through the mountains. Thankfully, Gandalf was on good terms with the Lord of the Eagles

 

Key Notes/Quotes

“Up the trees quick!” cried Gandalf; and they ran to the trees at the edge of the glade, hunting for those that had branches fairly low, or were slender enough to swarm up. They found them as quick as ever they could, you can guess; and up they went as high as ever they could trust the branches. You would have laughed (from a safe distance), if you had seen the dwarves sitting up in the trees with their beards dangling down, like old gentlemen gone cracked and playing at being boys. Fili and Kili were at the top of a tall larch like an enormous Christmas tree. Dori, Nori, Ori, Oin, and Gloin were more comfortable in a huge pine with regular branches sticking out at intervals like the spokes of a wheel. Bifur, Bofur, Bombur, and Thorin were in another. Dwalin and Balin had swarmed up a tall slender fir with few branches and were trying to find a place to sit in the greenery of the topmost boughs. Gandalf, who was a good deal taller than the others, had found a tree into which they could not climb, a large pine standing at the very edge of the glade. He was quite hidden in its boughs, but you could see his eyes gleaming in the moon as he peeped out.

Trees in the Misties were typical coniferous, temperate climate flora.

 

Thoughts

Gandalf’s gifts and talents continued to help and keep the Company alive and going. Sometimes it felt as if his journeys and adventures were dress-rehearsals for the ultimate TA events to unfold in LotR. Surviving a Hithaeglir crossing, managing orc and warg menaces, keeping the team together and out of trouble, calling for and getting help in time nicks. Thorin and Company were truly lucky to have him on their side.

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