Tag Archives: Aulë

knightandknights:蝴蝶夫人(魔女化) by 白 熊 Melkor hated the Sea, for he…

knightandknights:

蝴蝶夫人(魔女化) by 白 熊

Melkor hated the Sea, for he could not subdue it. It is said that in the making of Arda he endeavoured to draw Ossë to his allegiance, promising to him all the realm and power of Ulmo, if he would serve him. So it was that long ago there arose great tumults in the sea that wrought ruin to the lands. But Uinen, at the prayer of Aulë, restrained Ossë and brought him before Ulmo; and he was pardoned and returned to his allegiance, to which he has remained faithful. For the most part; for the delight in violence has never wholly departed from him, and at times he will rage in his wilfulness without any command from Ulmo his lord. Therefore those who dwell by the sea or go up in ships may love him, but they do not trust him.
-The Silmarillion, Valaquenta 

Imagine that. Uinen subdued Ossë at Aulë’s behest before they became spouses. I suspect she could curb Ossë’s violent tendencies and bring him to heel because her own greater capacity for violence (which she utilised to great effect subduing him) gave him pause. It’s just that she keeps it under control that much better than him. But he knows if ever she rose in wrath, there is nowhere to hide, because even Ulmo knew to give her due respect. Best not to give her any reason to get riled up in the first place!

knightandknights:蝴蝶夫人(魔女化) by 白 熊
Melkor hated the Sea, for he…

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Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 11 “Of the Sun and Moon and the Hiding of Valinor”

ted nasmith_the silmarillion_2_quenta silmarillion_11_of the sun and moon and the hiding of valinor_medReader deep thought: Well, “You’ve got mail!” was probably the alert most in the Blessed Realm could only dream of hearing forevermore. If there was any notion of the Valar going native with their penchant of looking like the locals, the opening preamble proved the Valar were superior beings not born of Arda. The more surprising revelation must be the potential of Fëanor. Got to wonder, why a Noldor? Why not a Vanyar? Also, the Sun and the Moon!
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Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 10 “Of the Sindar”

ThingolReader deep thought: So the only Calaquendi who saw the Two Trees but never lived in Valinor, ruled over his people, the Sindar (essentially the high-born of the Moriquendi), who also did not cross to the West. The intriguing question remains: was it really happenstance that kept Thingol in Middle-earth? With all that happened further down the road, and the connections that tie back ultimately to the Sindar or even Thingol himself, perhaps the Highest Power of them all agreed more strongly with Ulmo’s opinion than anyone realised, and had a plan that CANNOT.BE.DENIED, regardless of the Valar’s suppositions.

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Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 9 “Of the Flight of the Noldor”

Reader deep thought: How bitter the cup Melkor brewed. And yet it would not have burnt as terribly if not for Fëanor’s self-righteous hard-heartedness, and obsession with the Silmarils.
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Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 7 “Of the Silmarils and the Unrest of the Noldor”

Reader deep thought: Fëanor definitely was the poster-Elf of the Firster cred for the Elves. But pertinent to this chapter: where and how did Fëanor get the inspiration and knowledge to even conceive of making the Silmarils? Actually, since there were two trees, why did he think to make three? Why not one, or four? And did he name them? But really, with his rep sheet, Melkor was trusted again to walk free? He was the original frENEMY after all.

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Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 6 “Of Fëanor and the Unchaining of Melkor”

Reader deep thought: Putting aside the existential question of Finwë’s second-born, is it fair, to lay all that was wrought by the Doom of Fëanor upon Finwë’s decision to remarry? Maybe, maybe not. Fëanor’s disposition seemed to have precluded more optimistic possibilities. It seemed all that happened was destined to come to pass. Especially with Melkor in the mix. But really, Ilúvatar should have added a dollop of character judgment when he made the Ainur, or at least prescribed it for those who were entering Arda.

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Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 3 “Of the Coming of the Elves and the Captivity of Melkor”

Reader deep thought: Seriously, must there always be a catch to Ilúvatar’s gifts? The Elves got everything mortals could want. But out there in the wild wild east, the terror of Melkor consumed some of them. And once and for all: the Eldar are the westward-ho pioneers who followed Oromë, not every Legolas or Galdor.
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Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 2 “Of Aulë And Yavanna”

Reader deep thought: Why does Aulë’s penance seem like a by-the-way-you-got-them-in-trouble-too for Ilúvatar’s own children, as he puts it?
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