Tag Archives: Belegost

Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 22 “Of the Ruin of Doriath”

Reader deep thought: If Túrin’s story was epic in its melodrama and bitterness, a thousand thousandfold that must be Húrin’s lot, for not only was he the horrified, helpless spectator of the entire script Morgoth orchestrated, his part was not ended when his children died. Perhaps the only strand of comfort was his reunion with Morwen before the end. Still, again, Thingol figured greatly; his kingdom brought down utterly, thanks in part to his demise and Melian’s departure. Jewel fixation is a dangerous addiction.

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Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 20 “Of the Fifth Battle: Nirnaeth Arnoediad”

Reader deep thought: With the year it happened was everafter called “Year of Lamentation”, that surely was a mark of the abject horror among wars the Nirnaeth Arnoediad was. Unless one sat it out *cough*Doriath*cough*, everyone who signed up seemed to have died or suffered terrible fates in its aftermath. Even those who betrayed the allies were rewarded with just desserts, served cold and ironically bitter by the deceitful Morgoth. But truly, surviving Nirnaeth Arnoediad was really the raw deal to end all bad deals when you were Húrin.

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Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 16 “Of Maeglin”

Reader deep thought: Maeglin’s story seemed pitiable: grounded just for wanting to visit the (doing-better) relatives. And yet it also is disturbing he kept so much to himself so well. He was the crafty one, noting the enticing combo of Turgon’s lack of sons and one hot daughter so keenly from the get go. His impatience and need to have others bend to his will didn’t help his budding privileged entitlement complex. Turgon helped nurture it in fact. Prophetic plot development indeed.
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Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 10 “Of the Sindar”

ThingolReader deep thought: So the only Calaquendi who saw the Two Trees but never lived in Valinor, ruled over his people, the Sindar (essentially the high-born of the Moriquendi), who also did not cross to the West. The intriguing question remains: was it really happenstance that kept Thingol in Middle-earth? With all that happened further down the road, and the connections that tie back ultimately to the Sindar or even Thingol himself, perhaps the Highest Power of them all agreed more strongly with Ulmo’s opinion than anyone realised, and had a plan that CANNOT.BE.DENIED, regardless of the Valar’s suppositions.

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