Tag Archives: Doriath

(Source: vanessavalkyria.deviantart.com, via wooden-folks)Then…

(Source: vanessavalkyria.deviantart.com, via wooden-folks)


Then by the advice of Felagund Bëor gathered all the wandering families and kindreds of his people, and they removed over Gelion, and took up their abode in the lands of Amrod and Amras, upon the east banks of the Celon south of Nan Elmoth, near to the borders of Doriath; and the name of that land thereafter was Estolad, the Encampment.
– The Silmarillion, Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter XVII Of the Coming of Men into the West

(Source: vanessavalkyria.deviantart.com, via wooden-folks)Then…

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sitoutside:Outlook [16:9] by tylerforesthauser Its…

sitoutside:

Outlook [16:9]

by tylerforesthauser

Its northern and lesser part, the Forest of Neldoreth, was bounded east and south by the dark river Esgalduin, which bent westward in the midst of the land; and between Aros and Esgalduin lay the denser and greater woods of Region.
– The Silmarillion, Quenta Silmarillion Chapter XIV Of Beleriand and its Realms

sitoutside:Outlook [16:9]

by tylerforesthauser

Its…

Reader: The Silmarillion. Of the Rings of Power and the Third Age

Reader deep thought: The wrap-up! The end of the First Age saw the beginning of the Elven exodus, the Second marked the Downfall of Númenór. And here unveiled are the aftermath the Downfall, interwoven with the tale of how and why Sauron kept it up in Middle-earth after Morgoth’s done for, geology shakeup, and cliff-notes for the Third Age galore. Yes, including the entirety for Gollum’s being, Precious. Though, what is it with crafty Noldor and objects of great allure that must involve W.A.R. at some point?
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Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 22 “Of the Ruin of Doriath”

Reader deep thought: If Túrin’s story was epic in its melodrama and bitterness, a thousand thousandfold that must be Húrin’s lot, for not only was he the horrified, helpless spectator of the entire script Morgoth orchestrated, his part was not ended when his children died. Perhaps the only strand of comfort was his reunion with Morwen before the end. Still, again, Thingol figured greatly; his kingdom brought down utterly, thanks in part to his demise and Melian’s departure. Jewel fixation is a dangerous addiction.

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Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 21 “Of Túrin Turambar”

Reader deep thought: No wonder this chapter trumped the one on Beren and Lúthien; the Lay of Leithian was also the shorter compared to the Narn i Hîn Húrin. After reading this chapter, it’s beginning to feel like proper measures and superb fortifications against depression are needed to attempt the actual book. Unsurprisingly, the Silmarils again asserted their glittering allure. Still, buried under all the melodrama must be the great wonder of Thingol’s about-face on a core tenant of his belief system.
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Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 19 “Of Beren and Lúthien”

Reader deep thought: The Elven definition of a jolly good story is far out. This is the tale of Beren and Lúthien, which has been set into the fairest of Elven song: the Lay of Leithian, Release from Bondage. Just as the chapter on her folks’ courting was the shortest, Lúthien’s romance went the other direction; but it’s not the longest, having been edged out by that angsty tale of a guy related to her Man.
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Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 18 “Of the Ruin of Beleriand and the Fall of Fingolfin”

Reader deep thought: When even the sons of Fëanor were less inclined to march on Angband than Fingolfin, the time the Noldor were having in Middle-earth must be fantastic. But the bigger wonder was the notion of futilty in their struggle against Morgoth did not cross the Elves’ minds. Nor did the Edain understand the magnitude, longevity of his grudge bearing. Escalation was a horrible thing to behold: Dagor Bragollach, number four in the Beleriand War Collection was more terrible, expansive, and devastating in its reach than the preceding three.
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Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 17 “Of the Coming of Men into the West”

Reader deep thought: Despite their valour and valiant spirit, Men, who came after the glorious Elves , were clearly not of the same constitution as the Firstborn, who in turn were caught up in the intrigue of Ilúvatar’s gifts to Men. Especially the concept of death by old age, thanks to Bëor’s life demonstration. But the biggest question remained: “Why, Eru, why?”
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