Tag Archives: Dwarves

sublim-ature:Fairy Glen, WalesCraig McCormick Weren’t the…

sublim-ature:

Fairy Glen, Wales
Craig McCormick

Weren’t the Dwarves lucky they were not caught in the water deficient autumn/winter season? Would have been tough to barrel-ride their way to freedom (Follow-up to this)

sublim-ature:Fairy Glen, WalesCraig McCormick

Weren’t the…

Advertisements

sundxwn:Cold Morning Light by Mirko Fikentscher “There was a…

sundxwn:

Cold Morning Light by Mirko Fikentscher

“There was a most specially greedy, strong and wicked worm called Smaug. One day he flew up into the air and came south. The first we heard of it was a noise like a hurricane coming from the North, and the pinetrees on the Mountain creaking and cracking in the wind. Some of the dwarves who happened to be outside (I was one luckily—a fine adventurous lad in those days, always wandering about, and it saved my life that day)—well, from a good way off we saw the dragon settle on our mountain in a spout of flame. Then he came down the slopes and when he reached the woods they all went up in fire…. “
– Thorin. The Hobbit, Chapter 1: An Unexpected Party

sundxwn:Cold Morning Light by Mirko Fikentscher

“There was a…

On Dain II Ironfoot: Lord of the Iron Hills and King Under the Mountain

bilbosoaktree:

This has been a long time coming. This is basically Dáin: the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly. Except I’m here to argue that there’s a lot of good, very little bad, and, lbr, even less ugly.

image

Look at that face.

Read More

Everyone should read this. It’s a very detailed, and well-thought out thesis on book!Dain and his movie avatar. I have nothing to add except to draw attention to this bit:

Most of the negative opinions of Dáin seem to revolve around the idea that he refused Thorin and company aid when they most needed it, but
then was eager to come cash in on the reward when the dragon was dead and the
mountain retaken. I’d argue that this idea is a very misguided one. I think it’s
very reasonable that Dáin, Lord of a prosperous and happy people in the Iron
Hills, would decline to help on a quest that honestly seems ridiculous. When
the dragon came to Erebor, even an army of Ereborean Dwarves (as depicted in
the movie) couldn’t stop or kill the dragon, and countless Dwarves were killed
in the process. If the dragon were still alive and woken up, the Iron Hills are
close enough to possibly get paid a visit from Smaug. The chance of success is
very low, and the risk extremely high.

As a Tolkien reader, I find this litany highly applicable to all the interesting canon characters that the movies have taken and turned up the inherent or implied qualities of the characters picked to provide foil and counter-foil to the Company of Thorin, in that

“Most of the negative opinions of CHARACTER seem to revolve around the idea… I’d argue that this idea is a very misguided one. I think it’s very reasonable that CHARACTER, reasonreasonreason, would decline to help on a quest that honestly seems ridiculous.”

I am of course, thinking in particular about my personal canon!love, Thranduil the Elvenking. I have dome my share of movie feels and griping, but someday, hopefully soonish, I will put up a proper thesis for Thranduil that does him jusitce, just like bilbosoaktree‘s magnum opus for Dain. For now I will enjoy this piece and thank universityofarda for bringing both blog and post to my attention.

On Dain II Ironfoot: Lord of the Iron Hills and King Under the Mountain

Reader: The Silmarillion. Of the Rings of Power and the Third Age

Reader deep thought: The wrap-up! The end of the First Age saw the beginning of the Elven exodus, the Second marked the Downfall of Númenór. And here unveiled are the aftermath the Downfall, interwoven with the tale of how and why Sauron kept it up in Middle-earth after Morgoth’s done for, geology shakeup, and cliff-notes for the Third Age galore. Yes, including the entirety for Gollum’s being, Precious. Though, what is it with crafty Noldor and objects of great allure that must involve W.A.R. at some point?
Continue reading

Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 22 “Of the Ruin of Doriath”

Reader deep thought: If Túrin’s story was epic in its melodrama and bitterness, a thousand thousandfold that must be Húrin’s lot, for not only was he the horrified, helpless spectator of the entire script Morgoth orchestrated, his part was not ended when his children died. Perhaps the only strand of comfort was his reunion with Morwen before the end. Still, again, Thingol figured greatly; his kingdom brought down utterly, thanks in part to his demise and Melian’s departure. Jewel fixation is a dangerous addiction.

Continue reading

Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 21 “Of Túrin Turambar”

Reader deep thought: No wonder this chapter trumped the one on Beren and Lúthien; the Lay of Leithian was also the shorter compared to the Narn i Hîn Húrin. After reading this chapter, it’s beginning to feel like proper measures and superb fortifications against depression are needed to attempt the actual book. Unsurprisingly, the Silmarils again asserted their glittering allure. Still, buried under all the melodrama must be the great wonder of Thingol’s about-face on a core tenant of his belief system.
Continue reading

Movie: When social engineering has a spot at the drawing board [spoiler]

(With this post, my side-trip into BotFA/The Hobbit Movie feels, processing, and even quickie fix-it ficcing ends. The next post on Friday will pick up from where I left off with my notations for the Silmarillion chapters. Yes, the ANGST of Middle-earth cometh! Watch out for Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 21 “Of Túrin Turambar”.)
========
Thranduil_BotFAWith two viewings of BotFA, it’s enough to make me question if I want to go back for a third time. Very unusual for this fan of the Middle-earth movies. The thing is, I’ve been thinking, and I’m not happy it’s The Tauriel Conundrum having a field day(s) in my noggin, and not Thranduil’s visage. But the compound question of representation, political correction, affirmative action, and the emblematic social engineering in a movie series like The Hobbit is an interesting one.

(Fair warning. This is a LONG spiel, and there may be some controversial or uneasy to process thoughts about society after the cut, so look away now if it’s not your cuppa.)

Continue reading

Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 20 “Of the Fifth Battle: Nirnaeth Arnoediad”

Reader deep thought: With the year it happened was everafter called “Year of Lamentation”, that surely was a mark of the abject horror among wars the Nirnaeth Arnoediad was. Unless one sat it out *cough*Doriath*cough*, everyone who signed up seemed to have died or suffered terrible fates in its aftermath. Even those who betrayed the allies were rewarded with just desserts, served cold and ironically bitter by the deceitful Morgoth. But truly, surviving Nirnaeth Arnoediad was really the raw deal to end all bad deals when you were Húrin.

Continue reading