Tag Archives: Huor

Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 23 “Of Tuor and the Fall of Gondolin”

Reader deep thought: Tuor and Túrin. Two peas in a pod when they started. But their life stories could not be more different. What would have happened if Tuor had spoken to that tall, dark stranger he encountered at Irvin? Probably something bad (even were it no fault of the stranger), and somebody would behave badly. Whatever might have transpired, chances were it would have driven a trident in Ulmo’s plans and given him a litter of shark pups. So sometimes it does pay to heed the elders: Don’t speak to strangers!

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Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 21 “Of Túrin Turambar”

Reader deep thought: No wonder this chapter trumped the one on Beren and Lúthien; the Lay of Leithian was also the shorter compared to the Narn i Hîn Húrin. After reading this chapter, it’s beginning to feel like proper measures and superb fortifications against depression are needed to attempt the actual book. Unsurprisingly, the Silmarils again asserted their glittering allure. Still, buried under all the melodrama must be the great wonder of Thingol’s about-face on a core tenant of his belief system.
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Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 17 “Of the Coming of Men into the West”

Reader deep thought: Despite their valour and valiant spirit, Men, who came after the glorious Elves , were clearly not of the same constitution as the Firstborn, who in turn were caught up in the intrigue of Ilúvatar’s gifts to Men. Especially the concept of death by old age, thanks to Bëor’s life demonstration. But the biggest question remained: “Why, Eru, why?”
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Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 15 “Of the Noldor in Beleriand”

Reader deep thought: Of all the construction the Noldor had going on in Beleriand after they got back to stomping around Middle-earth, nothing trumped the deconstruction of perception Galadriel was forced to engage with Melian. The bigger question: were half-truths better than outright lies? Or avoidance for that matter?  Surely Galadriel, with her lifetime of experience in Valinor, knew what Melian was and the futility of being less than truthful. And yet, she was selectively sharing information, affecting an almost nose-thumb. Was it because Melian was cut-off from Valinor and therefore not as omnipotent as the run-of-mill Maiar? Or was Galadriel just experienced with managing the Powers?
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