Tag Archives: Manwë

Reader: The Silmarillion. Of the Rings of Power and the Third Age

Reader deep thought: The wrap-up! The end of the First Age saw the beginning of the Elven exodus, the Second marked the Downfall of Númenór. And here unveiled are the aftermath the Downfall, interwoven with the tale of how and why Sauron kept it up in Middle-earth after Morgoth’s done for, geology shakeup, and cliff-notes for the Third Age galore. Yes, including the entirety for Gollum’s being, Precious. Though, what is it with crafty Noldor and objects of great allure that must involve W.A.R. at some point?
Continue reading

Advertisements

Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 24 “Of the Voyage of Eärendil and the War of Wrath”

Reader deep thought: It had to take a man of uncommon heritage to take up, and succeed, where Turgon’s thirteen expeditions have failed. Still, Ulmo was definitely the unsung hero, working quietly (as ever), and sometimes on his own accord, able to see where sometimes even his higher brethren remained blithe. Blasphemy is not condonable, but does no one else breath a sigh of relief the Silmarils were finally beyond temptation’s reach? First Age=done!
Continue reading

Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 12 “Of Men”

Reader deep thought: So essentially the Valar adopted a change of chaperone style with the Atani. Can the Quendi be blamed for suspecting favourtism, and lacking fair interest disclosure? The Powers seemed to have swung too much the other way from interactive upbringing though, because what use are messages if the receiver can’t understand them? Still, no wonder the Atani felt such camaraderie with the Moriquendi.

Continue reading

Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 11 “Of the Sun and Moon and the Hiding of Valinor”

ted nasmith_the silmarillion_2_quenta silmarillion_11_of the sun and moon and the hiding of valinor_medReader deep thought: Well, “You’ve got mail!” was probably the alert most in the Blessed Realm could only dream of hearing forevermore. If there was any notion of the Valar going native with their penchant of looking like the locals, the opening preamble proved the Valar were superior beings not born of Arda. The more surprising revelation must be the potential of Fëanor. Got to wonder, why a Noldor? Why not a Vanyar? Also, the Sun and the Moon!
Continue reading

Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 9 “Of the Flight of the Noldor”

Reader deep thought: How bitter the cup Melkor brewed. And yet it would not have burnt as terribly if not for Fëanor’s self-righteous hard-heartedness, and obsession with the Silmarils.
Continue reading

Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 8 “Of the Darkening of Valinor”

500px-Morgoth_and_Ungoliant_by_ProtoguyReader deep thought: Forget about light-swallowing monsters far and near, here be the original beast, the Black Hole to end all black holes: Ungoliant, from parts unknown, and Melkor’s go-to gal of Binge.

Continue reading

Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 7 “Of the Silmarils and the Unrest of the Noldor”

Reader deep thought: Fëanor definitely was the poster-Elf of the Firster cred for the Elves. But pertinent to this chapter: where and how did Fëanor get the inspiration and knowledge to even conceive of making the Silmarils? Actually, since there were two trees, why did he think to make three? Why not one, or four? And did he name them? But really, with his rep sheet, Melkor was trusted again to walk free? He was the original frENEMY after all.

Continue reading

Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 6 “Of Fëanor and the Unchaining of Melkor”

Reader deep thought: Putting aside the existential question of Finwë’s second-born, is it fair, to lay all that was wrought by the Doom of Fëanor upon Finwë’s decision to remarry? Maybe, maybe not. Fëanor’s disposition seemed to have precluded more optimistic possibilities. It seemed all that happened was destined to come to pass. Especially with Melkor in the mix. But really, Ilúvatar should have added a dollop of character judgment when he made the Ainur, or at least prescribed it for those who were entering Arda.

Continue reading