Tag Archives: Silmarils

The Valar are not gods, Fëanor is not a hero and the Doom was not a curse

The Valar are not gods, Fëanor is not a hero and the Doom was not a curse:

beguilingblackness:

Let me start this by saying that my opinion is the final say on the matter and that any who disagree will be drawn and quartered… Of course not, you’re all allowed to disagree with the Lord of Darkness, Master of the World and King of Men. Nothing bad will come of it 🙂

Very interesting read, both the source and esbonline‘s addendum. I just like to say: History is written by the victor. =)

The Valar are not gods, Fëanor is not a hero and the Doom was not a curse

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On Valarin and the creation of the Silmarils

On Valarin and the creation of the Silmarils:

onehandedly:

curufinwefeanaro:

|| Yesterday lintamande answered a question of mine concerning Feanor learning Valarin (over here). Which prompted a conversation with misbehavingmaiar that ended up with me freaking out about what learning Valarin might mean in terms of creation of the…

Interesting read.

On Valarin and the creation of the Silmarils

Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 24 “Of the Voyage of Eärendil and the War of Wrath”

Reader deep thought: It had to take a man of uncommon heritage to take up, and succeed, where Turgon’s thirteen expeditions have failed. Still, Ulmo was definitely the unsung hero, working quietly (as ever), and sometimes on his own accord, able to see where sometimes even his higher brethren remained blithe. Blasphemy is not condonable, but does no one else breath a sigh of relief the Silmarils were finally beyond temptation’s reach? First Age=done!
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Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 22 “Of the Ruin of Doriath”

Reader deep thought: If Túrin’s story was epic in its melodrama and bitterness, a thousand thousandfold that must be Húrin’s lot, for not only was he the horrified, helpless spectator of the entire script Morgoth orchestrated, his part was not ended when his children died. Perhaps the only strand of comfort was his reunion with Morwen before the end. Still, again, Thingol figured greatly; his kingdom brought down utterly, thanks in part to his demise and Melian’s departure. Jewel fixation is a dangerous addiction.

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Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 21 “Of Túrin Turambar”

Reader deep thought: No wonder this chapter trumped the one on Beren and Lúthien; the Lay of Leithian was also the shorter compared to the Narn i Hîn Húrin. After reading this chapter, it’s beginning to feel like proper measures and superb fortifications against depression are needed to attempt the actual book. Unsurprisingly, the Silmarils again asserted their glittering allure. Still, buried under all the melodrama must be the great wonder of Thingol’s about-face on a core tenant of his belief system.
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Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 19 “Of Beren and Lúthien”

Reader deep thought: The Elven definition of a jolly good story is far out. This is the tale of Beren and Lúthien, which has been set into the fairest of Elven song: the Lay of Leithian, Release from Bondage. Just as the chapter on her folks’ courting was the shortest, Lúthien’s romance went the other direction; but it’s not the longest, having been edged out by that angsty tale of a guy related to her Man.
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Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 15 “Of the Noldor in Beleriand”

Reader deep thought: Of all the construction the Noldor had going on in Beleriand after they got back to stomping around Middle-earth, nothing trumped the deconstruction of perception Galadriel was forced to engage with Melian. The bigger question: were half-truths better than outright lies? Or avoidance for that matter?  Surely Galadriel, with her lifetime of experience in Valinor, knew what Melian was and the futility of being less than truthful. And yet, she was selectively sharing information, affecting an almost nose-thumb. Was it because Melian was cut-off from Valinor and therefore not as omnipotent as the run-of-mill Maiar? Or was Galadriel just experienced with managing the Powers?
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Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 12 “Of Men”

Reader deep thought: So essentially the Valar adopted a change of chaperone style with the Atani. Can the Quendi be blamed for suspecting favourtism, and lacking fair interest disclosure? The Powers seemed to have swung too much the other way from interactive upbringing though, because what use are messages if the receiver can’t understand them? Still, no wonder the Atani felt such camaraderie with the Moriquendi.

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