Tag Archives: Orcs

Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 23 “Of Tuor and the Fall of Gondolin”

Reader deep thought: Tuor and Túrin. Two peas in a pod when they started. But their life stories could not be more different. What would have happened if Tuor had spoken to that tall, dark stranger he encountered at Irvin? Probably something bad (even were it no fault of the stranger), and somebody would behave badly. Whatever might have transpired, chances were it would have driven a trident in Ulmo’s plans and given him a litter of shark pups. So sometimes it does pay to heed the elders: Don’t speak to strangers!

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Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 21 “Of Túrin Turambar”

Reader deep thought: No wonder this chapter trumped the one on Beren and Lúthien; the Lay of Leithian was also the shorter compared to the Narn i Hîn Húrin. After reading this chapter, it’s beginning to feel like proper measures and superb fortifications against depression are needed to attempt the actual book. Unsurprisingly, the Silmarils again asserted their glittering allure. Still, buried under all the melodrama must be the great wonder of Thingol’s about-face on a core tenant of his belief system.
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Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 19 “Of Beren and Lúthien”

Reader deep thought: The Elven definition of a jolly good story is far out. This is the tale of Beren and Lúthien, which has been set into the fairest of Elven song: the Lay of Leithian, Release from Bondage. Just as the chapter on her folks’ courting was the shortest, Lúthien’s romance went the other direction; but it’s not the longest, having been edged out by that angsty tale of a guy related to her Man.
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Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 18 “Of the Ruin of Beleriand and the Fall of Fingolfin”

Reader deep thought: When even the sons of Fëanor were less inclined to march on Angband than Fingolfin, the time the Noldor were having in Middle-earth must be fantastic. But the bigger wonder was the notion of futilty in their struggle against Morgoth did not cross the Elves’ minds. Nor did the Edain understand the magnitude, longevity of his grudge bearing. Escalation was a horrible thing to behold: Dagor Bragollach, number four in the Beleriand War Collection was more terrible, expansive, and devastating in its reach than the preceding three.
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Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 13 “Of The Return of the Noldor”

ted nasmith_the silmarillion_2_quenta silmarillion_13_of the return of the noldor_medReader deep thought: What an eventful time! The Noldor sure started their careers as Exiles with a bang, or three. And the Sun and the Moon sprung up in time to bear witness to the stuff of legends. Gothmog debuted, Fëanor passed, the Noldor-lords reunited willy-nilly, Noldor meets Sindar, and Thingol unhappy. But still, the Noldor prospered and there was diaspora, much thanks in part to Maedhros’ mellowing out, Finrod’s loyalty to their friendship, and the even-tempered EQ of Fingolfin. Everything happened. Even LOVE, blooming in Galadriel and Celeborn’s companionship in Menegroth (interestingly, both were Thingol’s kin). And yet, already two Wars of Beleriand before the end of the chapter, in the brief span of time right before the Sun first rose to her 60th anniversary, and the Silmarils were still in Morgoth’s ever scheming hands. Bummer. And what did the Noldor do? Siege Angband of course! Four hundred fifty years. Longevity hath its privileges.

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Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 10 “Of the Sindar”

ThingolReader deep thought: So the only Calaquendi who saw the Two Trees but never lived in Valinor, ruled over his people, the Sindar (essentially the high-born of the Moriquendi), who also did not cross to the West. The intriguing question remains: was it really happenstance that kept Thingol in Middle-earth? With all that happened further down the road, and the connections that tie back ultimately to the Sindar or even Thingol himself, perhaps the Highest Power of them all agreed more strongly with Ulmo’s opinion than anyone realised, and had a plan that CANNOT.BE.DENIED, regardless of the Valar’s suppositions.

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Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 9 “Of the Flight of the Noldor”

Reader deep thought: How bitter the cup Melkor brewed. And yet it would not have burnt as terribly if not for Fëanor’s self-righteous hard-heartedness, and obsession with the Silmarils.
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Reader: The Silmarillion. Quenta Silmarillion, Chapter 3 “Of the Coming of the Elves and the Captivity of Melkor”

Reader deep thought: Seriously, must there always be a catch to Ilúvatar’s gifts? The Elves got everything mortals could want. But out there in the wild wild east, the terror of Melkor consumed some of them. And once and for all: the Eldar are the westward-ho pioneers who followed Oromë, not every Legolas or Galdor.
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